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Evidence-based operational responses to mixed migration: challenges and best practice

Political economy and discourse on displacement and solutions | January 2020 | MMC | Regional | Briefing Paper

The study used a desk review of available literature and key informant interviews to identify best practices and successes in the Danish Refugee Council and other organisations in terms of using data and evidence to inform and improve operational protection responses for people on the move in mixed migration flows. Evidence Aid’s definitions of the five stages within the humanitarian programme cycle were used to assess the application of MMC evidence within the programme cycle and to highlight any gaps. The study also sought to identify specific barriers to practitioners in particular applying MMC data and analysis in operational programme responses.

The ripple effect: economic impacts of internal displacement

Internal displacement | January 2020 | IDMC | Regional | Research studies and reports

The report looks at Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya. These four case studies demonstrate the diversity of internal displacement’s consequences and possible responses by governments and their partners in supporting IDPs and host communities. The methodology introduced in this report is designed to provide quantitative findings whenever possible and a more comprehensive picture of the way displacement affects people’s lives and resources. It can inform aid providers’ decisions and help monitor progress. The type of granular insights it provides complements regional and global estimates of the economic impacts of internal displacement with more action-oriented, concrete findings that practitioners can use in their planning and programming.

Comprehensive Refugee Responses in the Horn of Africa

Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework | December 2019 | EU REF | Regional | Research Reports and Studies

This report looks at the progress made in each of our study countries. While giving credit where it is due, we also critically examine the challenges that have been encountered, what has not worked so well, and what remains to be done in the coming months and years.

Protection Analysis Somaliland 2019

Political economy and discourse on displacement and solutions | December 2019 | OXFAM | Somaliland | Research Reports

Oxfam has been operating and implementing development and humanitarian projects in Somaliland/Somalia for over 16 years, with WASH, Food Security, Livelihoods and Protection components. In March 2017, Oxfam began a humanitarian response to drought- and conflict-affected populations in Elafwein, Ainabo and Lasanod Districts in the Sool and Sanaag regions in Somaliland. The overall objective of the programme is to contribute to reducing acute humanitarian needs and increase the dignity of the most vulnerable men, women and children affected by drought in Somaliland. The organization has reached over 449,212 people so far since 2017. This Protection analysis is carried out as part of an ECHO-funded project in Sool and Sanaag, with the aim of informing and supporting programming, policy and advocacy work.

Supporting adaptive management: monitoring and evaluation tools and approaches

Political economy and discourse on displacement and solutions | December 2019 | ODI | Regional | Briefing Paper

This working paper introduces a set of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) tools and approaches, discussing their potential usefulness in supporting adaptive management in development and humanitarian programmes. It emphasises adaptive programmes characterised by complex aspects, such as: (1) they are innovative; (2) they have uncertain pathways for change; or (3) they operate in uncertain or unstable environments.

Durable solutions in Somalia: Moving from policies to practice for IDPs in Mogadishu

Internal displacement | December 2019 | Refugee International | Somalia | Research studies and reports

There is some good news to report from Somalia. The government, at both federal and municipal levels, has made great strides in developing policies and frameworks that aim to protect the rights of internally displaced people (IDPs) and promote lasting, durable solutions for them, including through local integration in urban areas. The key now is to implement those policies in an effective way.

Financing Refugee Hosting Contexts

Political economy and discourse on displacement and solutions | December 2019 | OECD | Regional | Briefing Paper

Protecting and supporting refugees is an important responsibility of the international community. The Global Compact on Refugees (GCR) was proposed in 2018 to establish a more predictable and equitable sharing of burdens and responsibilities among United Nations Member States when it comes to fulfilling these obligations. This working paper presents and analyses the findings of a survey circulated to members of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) between July and September 2018. The survey investigated trends in official development assistance (ODA) and plans for future funding to programmes and projects that support refugees and their host communities, as well as other, non-funding efforts and responses that DAC members are making in support of refugees. The findings of this paper will establish a baseline for monitoring progress toward “funding and effective and efficient use of resources” as one of the key tools for meeting the commitments of the GCR. The paper examines some of the strengths and challenges of current donor practices, and recommends a set of priorities to guide future donor support and engagement in order to promote good donorship and to support the international community in meeting the GCR’s objectives.

Refugee Displacement Development Digest

Political economy & discourse on displacement & solutions | November 2019 | R3D Ethiopia | Ethiopia | Newsletters

This first issue of Ethiopia’s Refugee Displacement Development Digest (R3D) which summarizes 18 projects and programmes. As commitments continue to be made, especially around the Global Refugee Forum (GRF), Ethiopia will surely continue to attract support for its proactive commitment to the GCR/CRRF – both as a responsible refugee-hosting nation, and as a leader in the Horn of Africa region. The next edition of this Digest is bound to show an increase in levels of partnerships, and, moreover, definitive tangible results for refugees and the Ethiopian communities that generously host them.

The Kalobeyei Model: Towards Self-Reliance for Refugees?

Refugee economies | October 2019 | Oxford RSC | Kenya | Research studies and reports

This report outlines a conceptual model and indicators for measuring refugee self-reliance, and applies it to the Kalobeyei settlement and Kakuma refugee camps context. The Kalobeyei settlement was opened in Turkana County in Kenya in 2016 with the intention of promoting the self-reliance of refugees and the host population and delivering integrated services to both. Its development is now guided by the Kalobeyei Integrated Social and Economic Development Programme (KISEDP), led by the Government of Kenya (GoK), the Turkana County Government, UNHCR, and partners. KISEDP envisions a range of innovative, market-based approaches to refugee protection that diverge from the conventional aid model implemented in Kakuma. These include cash-based programmes to meet housing, nutritional and other material needs, training to capitalise on the skills and entrepreneurial potential of refugees and hosts, and agricultural projects to promote dryland farming and household ‘kitchen gardens’. This report is based upon a 3-year study following newly arrived refugees integrated into the new Kalobeyei settlement and the old Kakuma refugee camp since 2016. The newly arrived refugees were allocated between the two contexts based on their date of arrival. In the study, we follow newly arrived South Sudanese refugee in both Kalobeyei and Kakuma in order to compare outcomes over time, and identify what difference the Kalobeyei settlement makes in comparison to the Kakuma model. We also follow newly arrived Ethiopian and Burundian refugees within Kalobeyei. The report covers two waves of data collection with the same randomly sampled respondent population, carried out in 2017 and 2018.

Doing Business in Kakuma: Refugees, Entrepreneurship, and the Food Market

Refugee economies | October 2019 | Oxford RSC | Kenya | Research studies and reports

This report draws upon a business survey with food retailers to assess the impact of the ‘Bamba Chakula’ model of electronic food transfers and business contracts. The Kakuma refugee camps have become popularly associated with entrepreneurship. In 2016, the Kalobeyei settlement was opened 3.5 kms away from the Kakuma camps, with the intention of promoting the self-reliance of refugees and the host population, and delivering integrated services to both. Its development is guided by the Kalobeyei Integrated Social and Economic Development Programme (KISEDP), which offers a range of innovative, market-based approaches to refugee protection that diverge from the conventional aid model implemented in Kakuma. There have been few studies that examine the emergence of refugee-led markets at the business level, whether in the Kakuma camps, in the Kalobeyei settlement, or elsewhere. In order to address this gap, our research aimed to study one particular sector: the food market. This sector is of particular interest because it is such a significant part of economic life in refugee camps, and because it is heavily shaped by the modalities of food assistance provided by the international community. Kakuma is currently undergoing a gradual transition from in-kind food assistance to cash-based assistance, and as an interim step, it has introduced a food provision model called Bamba Chakula.